Welcome to the Big6

You can do BIG things with Big6 Skills! Big6 is a six-stage model to help anyone solve problems or make decisions by using information. Some call it information literacy, information communication, or ICT skills, or a process, but we call it the Big6.

Using the Big6 information literacy process, you will identify information research goals, seek, use, and assemble relevant, credible information, then to reflect— is the final product effective and was my process efficient. The Big6 information literacy process is completely transferable to any grade level, subject area, or workplace. Big6, state and national instructional standards, and your curriculum all work together hand-in-hand.


Learning Curve: How College Graduates Solve Information Problems Once They Join the Workplace!

Posted by Mike Eisenberg (mike) on Oct 29 2012
Home >>

 

Excellent report from Project Information Literacy - by Alison Head - about the transition from college to work. 

L E A R N I N G   C U R V E: How College Graduates Solve Information Problems Once They Join the Workplace

BY ALISON J. HEAD, PH.D.
 
PROJECT INFORMATION LITERACY RESEARCH REPORT
 
THE PASSAGE STUDIES
 
October 16, 2012
 
RESEARCH SPONSORED BY THE INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES (IMLS) AND CONDUCTED IN COLLABORATION WITH THE BERKMAN CENTER FOR INTERNET AND SOCIETY AT HARVARD 
 
Abstract: Qualitative findings about the information-seeking behavior of today’s college graduates as they transition from the campus to the workplace. Included are findings from interviews with 23 US employers and focus groups with 33 recent graduates from four US colleges and universities, conducted as an exploratory study for Project Information Literacy’s (PIL’s) Passage Studies. Most  graduates in our focus groups said they found it difficult to solve information problems in the workplace, where unlike college, a sense of urgency pervaded and where personal contacts often reaped more useful results than online searches. Graduates said they leveraged essential information competencies from college for extracting content and also developed adaptive information-seeking strategies for reaching out to trusted colleagues in order to compensate for what they lacked. At the same time, employers said they recruited graduates, in part, for their online searching skills but still expected and needed more traditional research competencies, such as thumbing through bound reports, picking up the telephone, and interpreting research results with team members. They found that their college hires rarely demonstrated these competencies. Overall, our findings suggest there is a distinct difference between today’s graduates who demonstrated how quickly they found answers online and seasoned employers who needed college hires who use a combination of online and traditional methods to conduct comprehensive research.
 
For full study, please see:
 
For more on Project Information Literacy see: http://projectinfolit.org

Last changed: Nov 12 2012 at 10:49 AM

Back